SINTRA
PRESS
PHOTO
OCT 2017 MU.SA
SINTRA'S
ART
MUSEUM

Reflexo Theatrical and Cultural Association is pleased to present another edition of Sintra Press Photo, an annual photojournalism exhibition taking place in MU.SA (Sintra Art Museum), commencing on October 14.

Financed by the local council, União de Juntas de Freguesias de Sintra, and with the support of Câmara Municipal de Sintra, this year’s event will approach the theme of “Suburbia”, showing stories of people and places living on the margin of society in various regions of the globe.

Celebrating a permanent position in Portugal’s cultural space, Sintra Press Photo will exhibit once again works by three internationally renowned photojournalists, known for the dedication and unique style in their approach to the important issues they document during their distinguished careers.

From Portugal we invite João Pina, a photographer with a broad international portfolio, currently living in the US where he is the receiver of the prestigious Nieman Foundation Fellowship from Harvard University. In Sintra, this photographer will exhibit ‘Hidden Faces of the FARC’, a portrait series of guerrilla fighters from the historical revolutionary forces of Colombia. Travelling to their final military conference in the Yari plains in southern Colombia, João Pina chose to photograph the faces of the fighters using a large format camera and polaroid instant film, where he would ask the subjects to hand sign their “nom de guerre” and respective ages. The thoughtful and careful approach - a characteristic style of work by the acclaimed Portuguese photographer -, resulted in an intimate story that gives a face to the anonymous phantoms hiding for decades somewhere deep in the jungle.

From Brazil we receive André Liohn, the renowned war photographer awarded in 2012 with the prestigious Robert Capa Gold Medal for his brave coverage of the Libyan civil war. This photographer from Botucatu shows in Sintra ‘Revogo’, a deep view of Brazil’s institutionalised culture of violence that in the last year has culminated in around 60 thousand murders. A number higher than in many Middle Eastern or African countries considered at war. Andre Liohn’s vast experience covering conflict is palpable in the approach to this story, where the Brazilian photographer returning to his home country found a society on the edge, caught between gang violence and police brutality.

Last but not least, Siegfried Modola show us a strong view from within the shanty neighbourhoods of the Kenyan capital, Nairobi. In ‘A Struggle Amid Poverty and Crime’, the Italian-British photographer portrays the daily life of neighbourhoods where more than two million people live in precarious conditions, and where prostitution, theft, drug abuse and generalised crime is common place. Have lived most of his life in Kenya and working for the last decade covering conflict and humanitarian crisis throughout the African continent, Siegfried Modola manages to bring us on a journey into the underworld of a city seen by many as the economic and innovative capital of Africa, and documents the harsh reality of millions affected by crime and extreme poverty.

Sintra Press photo 2017 will kick-off with a panel discussion by the three guest photographers, taking part in a light debate on their work, photography and journalism. This event provides the public with an insight into the work and life of some of leading international photojournalists.

“I was not born to be a photographer. The realities and expectations for those born in the time and place where I come from were not made of dreams. Those with whom I shared my childhood where born to be criminals, prostitutes, drug addicts or dead in early age. Photography appeared in my life for the first time when was 6 and my parents, maybe because of their catholic believes or maybe by some form of love decided to marry. In that small ceremony, one of my mother’s friend allowed me to take a few pictures with her pocket Kodak Instamatic. I still remember how hard they had to work before they could convince me to give the camera back. In that moment I had discovered something special and unique. I had discovered something that could be used to show the world as I saw it to be. I’m looking for a photography that brings me questions rather than offer answers. Sentenced by my personal traumas but inspired by the possibilities I see in them, I use my own inquietude as an essential element in my search for a personal visual expression. My motivation in photojournalism is my honest believe that visual documentation of life is a decisive factor in the way we understand the world around us.”

André  work as photographer and documentary producer and director.

His photos have been published by Der Spiegel Magazine, The New York Times, Newsweek, The Guardian, El Pais, Le Point, Time, STATUS, Die Welt, Stern, A Magasinet, Estado de Sao Paulo, Folha de Sao Paulo. His videos are broadcast on BBC, CNN, Al Jazeera english, RAI, NRK, ITV, SBT, Der Spiegel TV, RTL, France 24, etc.

In Libya, Andre Liohn cooperated with the ICRC documenting the work of doctors working in front lines of wars. In 2012 the ICRC received the 16th Annual Webby Awards for the front-line footage shot by André Liohn. André Liohn is the creator of   “ADIL - Almost Dawn in Libya project: Photojournalism as a possible Bridge for Reconciliation”,  with the several other renowned photographers.

In 2012 André was awarded with the Robert Capa Gold Medal, for his series  of images taken in the besieged Libyan city of Misrata.

www.prospektphoto.net/authors/andre-liohn/

Revogo (Brazil)

In the 2016 CCSP-JP, a Mexican NGO, has published the ranking of the 50 most violent cities in the world. All but 8 of the 50 worst cities on the list are to be found in Latin America and 19 in Brazil. Numbers that make someone’s blood run cold, even if we only analyse  Brazil where in the last year homicides have been 60.000. Police has killed an average of 6 persons everyday and violence has triplicated.

Only Syria is worst while in the last three years, with 172.000 homicides, Brazil by itself has exceeded all the killed victims of 12 countries like Iraq, Sudan, Afghanistan, Colombia, Congo, Sri Lanka, India, Somalia, Nepal, Kashmir, Pakistan and Israel.

According to the “Map of violence: Homicide and youth in Brazil”,  violence among the Brazilian youths has increased over the past three decades.Between 1980 and 2011, the violent deaths of young people – caused by accidents, homicide or suicide – grew by 207.9% and, if we consider only murders, this increase reaches 326.1%.

It’s drug that has turned Brazilian favelas into an hell, with millions of human beings forced to live without sewers, hostage of an absent government or, even worse, accomplice of the gangs that compete for the huge drugs market.  Everyday, very young affiliates of the gangs, as well as their relatives and friends, are involved in bloody revenges that cause deaths not only among civilians but also among the police  that tries to contain the wave of violence that at this point looks unstoppable.

Simultaneously to what happens in the favelas, during last years  Brazil has seen an increase of demonstrations by citizens tired out  by the huge disruptions in public services and by the rise of taxes caused by the organisation of big events like the Football World Cup and the Olympic Games;  demonstrations that very often are suppressed by police with an excessive use of force.

“In Brazil the possibility of violent death is present in everybody’s life. At any moment, wherever you are, no matter how much money you have”.

João Pina was born in Lisbon, Portugal in 1980 and started working as a photographer at the age of 18. Having spent most of the last decade working in Latin America.

In 2007 he published his first book “Por teu livre pensamento” featuring the stories of 25 former Portuguese political prisoners, with his colleague and friend Rui Daniel Galiza who wrote the texts. The work from his first book, inspired an Amnesty International advertising campaign, that got him a Lion d’Or award on the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity in 2011, among other awards he has been granted the Moving Walls 21 (2014), SPA award (2012) Estação Imagem grant (2010), PDN Photo Annual (2010), and a finalist for the Fotoevidence Book Award (2014) Gabriel Garcia Marquez prize (2013) Henri Nannen award (2011), Care award (2011) the Lumix Festival Award (2011), the Alexandra Boulat Grant (2009) and the Estação Imagem Award (2017).

His work has been published in The New York Times, The New Yorker, Time Magazine, Newsweek, Stern, GEO, El Pais Semanal, La Vanguardia Magazine, D Magazine, Io Donna, Days Japan, Expresso and Visão among others.

He has exhibited his work in New York (Open Society Foundations, International Center of Photography, Point of View Gallery and Howard Greenberg Gallery), Tokyo (Canon gallery), Rio de Janeiro (Museu de Arte Moderna), São Paulo (Paço das Artes), Lisbon (KGaleria and Casa Fernando Pessoa) and Porto (Centro Português de Fotografia) and in Perpignan (Visa pour L’Image). In 2014 he finished his longest personal project, publishing his second book “CONDOR”, showing the remnants of a military operation named Operation Condor aimed at destroying the political opposition to the military dictatorships in South America  during the 1970s.

He graduated from the Photojournalism and Documentary Photography program of the International Center of Photography in New York (2004/2005), and is currently the receiver of the prestigious Nieman Foundation Fellowship in Harvard (2017/2018).

www.joao-pina.com

Hidden faces of the FARC (Colombia)

The soldiers of the last major guerrilla army in the Western Hemisphere have been mostly ghosts until now. A few appeared in grainy “Wanted” posters and archival photographs, but most of the members of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) were anonymous phantoms, hiding somewhere deep in the jungle. With the winding down of the conflict, the FARC decided to host its 10th and final military conference in the Yari plans in southern Colombia. Joao Pina decided to photograph the faces of the fighters, using a large format camera and polaroid instant film, where he would ask the fighters to hand sign their "war" names and ages. Story published in the Washington Post and Sábado Magazine.

Born in 1980, Siegfried Modola is an independent Italian/British photojournalist and documentary photographer working predominantly in Africa. He focuses on social and geopolitical events that impact on the lives of people caught in between some of the most critical humanitarian crisis of our time.

After finishing his BA degree in Journalism and Media Communication in Dublin, Ireland, he went on to earn a Master’s in Photojournalism and Documentary Photography in London, UK. He lives with his family in Paris from where he regularly travels for assignments and longer-term projects. He grew up in Kenya and he still uses Nairobi as a base for his work through the continent.

Since 2010 he has travelled and reported on in over a dozen countries across Africa. He has also covered the Syrian refugee crisis in northern Iraq and the 2014 Israel-Gaza war.

Siegfried is a regular contributor for the Reuters news agency through out Africa and further afield. He has been commissioned for assignments by the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, the Financial Times, Le Monde, Der Spiegel, Suddeutsche Zeitung, Terra Mater, Guardian UK, La Repubblica and the African Report amongst others.

He also produces work for humanitarian aid agencies such as Medicines Sans Frontiers, Red Cross, UHNCR, UNICEF and Oxfam.

His photographs have appeared in Time, New York Times, L'Express, Le Monde, Liberation, Figaro, Paris Match, Geo, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, Guardian, Repubblica, Internazionale, Grazia (UK), Neue Zurcher Zeitung, Der Spiegel, Courrier Internacional, Vanity Fair and the Russian magazine among others.

www.siegfriedmodola.com

A Struggle Amid Poverty and Crime (Kenya)

Around two million people have made their homes in the shantytowns packed in and around Kenya’s capital – Nairobi.

These densely populated neighbourhoods are bustling and bursting with energy. Churches are packed, young men hang out at the area’s gyms and friends gather at roadside stalls serving barbecued chicken. But crime and unemployment are high and basic services scarce.

People in ramshackle dwellings of wood, carton and corrugated iron sheets describe a daily struggle to make a living. Some turn to prostitution - others to theft, drug abuse and crime. Many Kenyans complain about how police deal with the public, so crime often goes unreported and relations with officers are strained. One man explained how his 20-year-old son was killed during a police operation last year.

The government has urged residents to report corrupt or violent police officers. But the man asked not to be named for fear of reprisal.

Alice, 20, says her partner was killed in a shoot-out five years ago. Left with no means to support herself and her newborn baby son, she started working as a prostitute. Claire, 17, said she has been a sex worker since she was 14.

Drug and alcohol addiction is a common problem. An illegal brew called Chang’aa is prepared over open fires in oil drums in the slum of Mathare. In Huruma, Stanley and Saaid are heroin addicts. Stanley 36, is a rubbish collector and Saaid, 32, gathers unused metal to sell for recycling.

“It is a hard life here,” says Kiru, nursing his drink in a bar in Korogocho. Across the room, staff serve drinks, separated off from customers by a grid of metal rods.

André Liohn

“I was not born to be a photographer. The realities and expectations for those born in the time and place where I come from were not made of dreams. Those with whom I shared my childhood where born to be criminals, prostitutes, drug addicts or dead in early age. Photography appeared in my life for the first time when was 6 and my parents, maybe because of their catholic believes or maybe by some form of love decided to marry. In that small ceremony, one of my mother’s friend allowed me to take a few pictures with her pocket Kodak Instamatic. I still remember how hard they had to work before they could convince me to give the camera back. In that moment I had discovered something special and unique. I had discovered something that could be used to show the world as I saw it to be. I’m looking for a photography that brings me questions rather than offer answers. Sentenced by my personal traumas but inspired by the possibilities I see in them, I use my own inquietude as an essential element in my search for a personal visual expression. My motivation in photojournalism is my honest believe that visual documentation of life is a decisive factor in the way we understand the world around us.”

André  work as photographer and documentary producer and director.

His photos have been published by Der Spiegel Magazine, The New York Times, Newsweek, The Guardian, El Pais, Le Point, Time, STATUS, Die Welt, Stern, A Magasinet, Estado de Sao Paulo, Folha de Sao Paulo. His videos are broadcast on BBC, CNN, Al Jazeera english, RAI, NRK, ITV, SBT, Der Spiegel TV, RTL, France 24, etc.

In Libya, Andre Liohn cooperated with the ICRC documenting the work of doctors working in front lines of wars. In 2012 the ICRC received the 16th Annual Webby Awards for the front-line footage shot by André Liohn. André Liohn is the creator of   “ADIL - Almost Dawn in Libya project: Photojournalism as a possible Bridge for Reconciliation”,  with the several other renowned photographers.

In 2012 André was awarded with the Robert Capa Gold Medal, for his series  of images taken in the besieged Libyan city of Misrata.

www.prospektphoto.net/authors/andre-liohn/

Revogo (Brazil)

In the 2016 CCSP-JP, a Mexican NGO, has published the ranking of the 50 most violent cities in the world. All but 8 of the 50 worst cities on the list are to be found in Latin America and 19 in Brazil. Numbers that make someone’s blood run cold, even if we only analyse  Brazil where in the last year homicides have been 60.000. Police has killed an average of 6 persons everyday and violence has triplicated.

Only Syria is worst while in the last three years, with 172.000 homicides, Brazil by itself has exceeded all the killed victims of 12 countries like Iraq, Sudan, Afghanistan, Colombia, Congo, Sri Lanka, India, Somalia, Nepal, Kashmir, Pakistan and Israel.

According to the “Map of violence: Homicide and youth in Brazil”,  violence among the Brazilian youths has increased over the past three decades.Between 1980 and 2011, the violent deaths of young people – caused by accidents, homicide or suicide – grew by 207.9% and, if we consider only murders, this increase reaches 326.1%.

It’s drug that has turned Brazilian favelas into an hell, with millions of human beings forced to live without sewers, hostage of an absent government or, even worse, accomplice of the gangs that compete for the huge drugs market.  Everyday, very young affiliates of the gangs, as well as their relatives and friends, are involved in bloody revenges that cause deaths not only among civilians but also among the police  that tries to contain the wave of violence that at this point looks unstoppable.

Simultaneously to what happens in the favelas, during last years  Brazil has seen an increase of demonstrations by citizens tired out  by the huge disruptions in public services and by the rise of taxes caused by the organisation of big events like the Football World Cup and the Olympic Games;  demonstrations that very often are suppressed by police with an excessive use of force.

“In Brazil the possibility of violent death is present in everybody’s life. At any moment, wherever you are, no matter how much money you have”.

João Pina

João Pina was born in Lisbon, Portugal in 1980 and started working as a photographer at the age of 18. Having spent most of the last decade working in Latin America.

In 2007 he published his first book “Por teu livre pensamento” featuring the stories of 25 former Portuguese political prisoners, with his colleague and friend Rui Daniel Galiza who wrote the texts. The work from his first book, inspired an Amnesty International advertising campaign, that got him a Lion d’Or award on the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity in 2011, among other awards he has been granted the Moving Walls 21 (2014), SPA award (2012) Estação Imagem grant (2010), PDN Photo Annual (2010), and a finalist for the Fotoevidence Book Award (2014) Gabriel Garcia Marquez prize (2013) Henri Nannen award (2011), Care award (2011) the Lumix Festival Award (2011), the Alexandra Boulat Grant (2009) and the Estação Imagem Award (2017).

His work has been published in The New York Times, The New Yorker, Time Magazine, Newsweek, Stern, GEO, El Pais Semanal, La Vanguardia Magazine, D Magazine, Io Donna, Days Japan, Expresso and Visão among others.

He has exhibited his work in New York (Open Society Foundations, International Center of Photography, Point of View Gallery and Howard Greenberg Gallery), Tokyo (Canon gallery), Rio de Janeiro (Museu de Arte Moderna), São Paulo (Paço das Artes), Lisbon (KGaleria and Casa Fernando Pessoa) and Porto (Centro Português de Fotografia) and in Perpignan (Visa pour L’Image). In 2014 he finished his longest personal project, publishing his second book “CONDOR”, showing the remnants of a military operation named Operation Condor aimed at destroying the political opposition to the military dictatorships in South America  during the 1970s.

He graduated from the Photojournalism and Documentary Photography program of the International Center of Photography in New York (2004/2005), and is currently the receiver of the prestigious Nieman Foundation Fellowship in Harvard (2017/2018).

www.joao-pina.com

Hidden faces of the FARC (Colombia)

The soldiers of the last major guerrilla army in the Western Hemisphere have been mostly ghosts until now. A few appeared in grainy “Wanted” posters and archival photographs, but most of the members of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) were anonymous phantoms, hiding somewhere deep in the jungle. With the winding down of the conflict, the FARC decided to host its 10th and final military conference in the Yari plans in southern Colombia. Joao Pina decided to photograph the faces of the fighters, using a large format camera and polaroid instant film, where he would ask the fighters to hand sign their "war" names and ages. Story published in the Washington Post and Sábado Magazine.

Siegfried Modola

Born in 1980, Siegfried Modola is an independent Italian/British photojournalist and documentary photographer working predominantly in Africa. He focuses on social and geopolitical events that impact on the lives of people caught in between some of the most critical humanitarian crisis of our time.

After finishing his BA degree in Journalism and Media Communication in Dublin, Ireland, he went on to earn a Master’s in Photojournalism and Documentary Photography in London, UK. He lives with his family in Paris from where he regularly travels for assignments and longer-term projects. He grew up in Kenya and he still uses Nairobi as a base for his work through the continent.

Since 2010 he has travelled and reported on in over a dozen countries across Africa. He has also covered the Syrian refugee crisis in northern Iraq and the 2014 Israel-Gaza war.

Siegfried is a regular contributor for the Reuters news agency through out Africa and further afield. He has been commissioned for assignments by the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, the Financial Times, Le Monde, Der Spiegel, Suddeutsche Zeitung, Terra Mater, Guardian UK, La Repubblica and the African Report amongst others.

He also produces work for humanitarian aid agencies such as Medicines Sans Frontiers, Red Cross, UHNCR, UNICEF and Oxfam.

His photographs have appeared in Time, New York Times, L'Express, Le Monde, Liberation, Figaro, Paris Match, Geo, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, Guardian, Repubblica, Internazionale, Grazia (UK), Neue Zurcher Zeitung, Der Spiegel, Courrier Internacional, Vanity Fair and the Russian magazine among others.

www.siegfriedmodola.com

A Struggle Amid Poverty and Crime (Kenya)

Around two million people have made their homes in the shantytowns packed in and around Kenya’s capital – Nairobi.

These densely populated neighbourhoods are bustling and bursting with energy. Churches are packed, young men hang out at the area’s gyms and friends gather at roadside stalls serving barbecued chicken. But crime and unemployment are high and basic services scarce.

People in ramshackle dwellings of wood, carton and corrugated iron sheets describe a daily struggle to make a living. Some turn to prostitution - others to theft, drug abuse and crime. Many Kenyans complain about how police deal with the public, so crime often goes unreported and relations with officers are strained. One man explained how his 20-year-old son was killed during a police operation last year.

The government has urged residents to report corrupt or violent police officers. But the man asked not to be named for fear of reprisal.

Alice, 20, says her partner was killed in a shoot-out five years ago. Left with no means to support herself and her newborn baby son, she started working as a prostitute. Claire, 17, said she has been a sex worker since she was 14.

Drug and alcohol addiction is a common problem. An illegal brew called Chang’aa is prepared over open fires in oil drums in the slum of Mathare. In Huruma, Stanley and Saaid are heroin addicts. Stanley 36, is a rubbish collector and Saaid, 32, gathers unused metal to sell for recycling.

“It is a hard life here,” says Kiru, nursing his drink in a bar in Korogocho. Across the room, staff serve drinks, separated off from customers by a grid of metal rods.

Joint Organization

Teatro Reflexo

Rua da Pedreira, 14-A
2710-121 Cabriz, Sintra

P +351 214213188
www.teatroreflexo.org
info@sintrapressphoto.com

União Freguesias Sintra



www.uniaofreguesiassintra.pt
geral@uniaodasfreguesias-sintra.pt

Apoios

Team

Direction
José Chaíça
Michel Simeão
Paulo Nunes dos Santos

Curatorship
Paulo Nunes dos Santos

Assistant Producer
Ana Custódio

Press Office
RB & JPC. lda

Translation of materials
Miguel Sousa

Communication and Webdesign
Thisislove studio